Mersey basin Campaign

Items tagged archaeology

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Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC033 Mersey People: The Community Archaeologist The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, community activist and archaeologist Tracy Lawley from Brinnington talks about Stockport's relationship with the Mersey, and a unique community archaeology project to connect people with their heritage. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC145 Before The Storm Is it absurd to compare the Mersey with the Nile, or Stockport Viaduct with the Pyramids of Giza? Perhaps it is. Yet the pyramids are the remains of a dead civilisation which became a historical backwater. The industrial civilisation which started on the Mersey’s banks changed the world physically, culturally and musically – and in India and China it is still doing so today. Mersey: The river that changed the world, published by Liverpool’s Bluecoat Press to mark Capital of Culture 2008, was a richly illustrated book that explored these connections through a series of specially commissioned essays from writers, journalists and experts in fields as diverse as archaeology, history, music, wildlife and architecture. In this chapter Edwin Coyler reveals the story washed away by altered erosion patterns along the Wirral Shore. The ancient port of Meols is one of Britain's most facinating archaeological finds and it's likely that it once played a vital role in the trade and economy of the Mersey region.