Mersey basin Campaign

Items tagged fish

Found 5 items. Page 1

Publication dateJanuary 2006 MBC004 Factsheet - Freshwater Fish A brief factsheet on freshwater fish, specifically those found in Northwest England. This document covers species of freshwater fish found in Great Britain, with more detail on those found in the waterways of the Northwest. Publication dateSeptember 2006 MBC008 Breathing new life into the Mersey: Water quality and fisheries in the Mersey Estuary - a historical perspective Taking a long-term perspective, this scientific paper provides detailed information about the effects of improvements in water quality on the fish population of the Mersey. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC015 Mersey People: The Angler The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, young angler Louise Clarke talks about fishing in the Mersey Estuary. Publication dateNovember 2007 MBC025 Mersey People: The Regulator The Mersey and its people – for hundreds of years it has been impossible to say which influences the other most. Without the river there would have been no port, no merchants, no ferries, no shipbuilding. Many of the towns and cities that were the cradle of the industrial revolution wouldn’t exist, and countless lives defined by their relationship to the water would have been lived differently. But the river, too, has been shaped by its people. Dredged, bridged and canalised, its natural flow has been changed to better serve us. It has been polluted by industry, and revived by a clean-up campaign that is the envy of the world. With the Mersey in the midst of a renaissance, many 21st century lives are still entwined with it, whether for employment, recreation or inspiration. From ferrymen to cabinet ministers, policement to anglers, their stories tell the tale of the Mersey, the river that changed the world. For more information visit: http://www.riverthatchangedtheworld.com/mersey In this episode, Diane Walker, an Environment Agency regulator talks about her work, the problems of tracing pollution in the Mersey and its tributaries. Publication dateApril 2000 MBC056 The Mersey Estuary - back from the dead? Solving a 150 year old problem The Mersey Estuary has suffered a legacy of abuse and neglect since the beginning of the industrial revolution. The discharge of effluents from manufacturing processes, together with wastewater from the burgeoning centres of population, resulted in the estuary gaining the unenviable reputation of bring one of the most polluted rivers in Europe. As a result of the long awaited remedial action, which has been implemented over the past fifteen years, there is now unequivocal evidence that the water quality of the river and the biology of the system have improved significantly and will continue to do so as further planned alleviation schemes are completed. This paper reviews the achievements, which have been made at the halfway stage in the 25-year multi-billion pound clean up campaign.